Browsing Posts published in May, 2011

Stock lock key, tumber and 3d printed keyNirav Patel looks like he likes to play with some diverse toys and has shared much at his blog.  Lately it seems he’s taken to 3D printing and offers a some useful tidbits in Physical Keygen: Duplicating House Keys on a 3D Printer.

 

Also, WeatherSpark.com is something I’ve been looking for a long time.  Thank you StumbleUpon!  It’s an easy to navigate way to have a look at historic weather data.  I don’t know how much it covers, but in my area it goes all the way back to 1980!  Looking at temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, thunderstorms and more!

Geo01005′s RepRap Ideas details some of his work around running a repstrap using EMC2 from a couple years ago. He’s documented some of his work around the hot-He also has a YouTube channel.

Andrew Angellotti is founder of spingarage LLC has a new blog that’s looking pretty interesting.  Here’s the first part of a tutorial on brushless motor control.

Tim has a great collection of posts on repstrapping over at BotHacker.

So again I wanted to work on putting together the next piece in the EMC2 Servo lab series tonight only to thwart myself.  I shot a bunch of pictures last night with my newly rehabilitated camera. When I sat down today my iPhoto library was kinda corrupted so I decided to rebuild it.  Well right there I lost about 3 hours of access to my pics so I decided to play around a bit with iMovie instead as I know I’ll want to include some video later on, so here’s a quick demo of my apparatus cycling.

[youtube id="kpGAjKVLZgA" w="240" h="190"]
[caption id="attachment_318" align="alignright" width="168" caption="Assembled Kit (screw hardware not included)"]Solarbotics Compact L298 Motor Driver[/caption]

Based on the venerable L298 Dual H-Bridge , Solarbotics has put together a really nice little kit for low-mid voltage level motor control applications.

You trade a little sweat equity for the few bucks you save over other offerings by fully assembling the kit yourself.

One of the nice bits about this kit is that it includes a 5V regulator to supply the logic portion of the L298 natively instead of relying on a 2nd supply voltage to the board.  This helps to make it very easy to drive either 2 DC motors or a single stepper motor from a microcontroller or other control device. 

Click to continue reading “Review: Solarbotics Compact L298 Motor Driver”

Well I’d planned on spending the evening snapping pics and scratching out the next part in the inkjet and servo lab series, but when I pulled my trusty Olympus SP-350 out of the backpack, I discovered it made some odd grinding noises, extended and retracted the lens a couple times eventually displaying “Zoom Error” on the screen. ARGH!!!

Click to continue reading “Because caucasians are too damn tall…”

EMC2 is a popular choice among hobbyists, academics and a growing group of professionals for CNC and robotic machine control. Most commonly it seems to be used to drive machines using stepper motors for reasons related to low cost and complexity. In actuality EMC2 drives servo mechanisms equally well, but in doing my research in preparation for my own projects I found that there was a need for a simple tutorial laying out basic procedures for integrating servo control under EMC2. As always, the very best way to learn is to do so I ended up playing with a small servo “lab” so I could visit as many concepts and parameters as I could before applying them to a larger machine.

Click to continue reading “Tutorial: Use an Old Inkjet Printer to Learn Servo Motor Control With EMC2 – Part 1″

Another concept for 3D printing on a re-purposed inkjet printer.

[youtube id="2nbtZOolSIY" w="240" h="190"]

 

More Links:

Servo and PID tutorials from Galil Motion Control Inc.

Servo Tuning Tutorial (PDF)  from PMC Corp.

[caption id="attachment_260" align="alignright" width="210" caption="Pololu A4983 with a nickle for scale"]Pololu A4983[/caption]

One of the things I need to do while working towards motion control projects is to practice some of the fundamentals.  I’ve worked with many of the concepts and mechanisms professionally, but more from the support end.  I haven’t touched the stuff for a few years now, and want to learn things at a more fundamental level.  In order to do this my plan is to pull motors and mechanisms from recycled equipment (printers, scanners, etc.) and set up a few labs for myself along the way.  Perhaps I’ll try to salvage some of the electronics as well with some good old-fashioned circuit bending.  I should be able to at least reuse motor drivers that are found, but for now I’m going to rely on inexpensive motor driver kits to allow myself more freedom to experiment.

Click to continue reading “Review: Pololu A4983 Micro Stepping Driver Carrier”

Some links that have turned up while doing research:

Musings on the usefulness of inkjet printers for a variety of applications.  So ok, I’m not the only one who’s been thinking about this, but here I hope to actually do something about it!

Anders is playing with EMC2 and RepRap functionality as well.  I’ve experimented with some of his temperature control ideas already, but need to work at the PID tuning a lot more.

PyroElectro has a bunch of tutorials for all kinds of fun stuff like this basic DIY servo/encoder setup.

 

Background

I started playing with EMC on a simple home-build concept mill I built about 9 years ago and it’s been shelved for most of the time since.  I really enjoyed the experience of getting that to work and have followed several other software/hardware projects online since including EMC2 and the RepRap/Makerbot crowd with great enthusiasm.  A couple years ago I was even able to apply what I’d learned to a job running some small CNC machines for a manufacturer in Aurora Ontario.

Click to continue reading “Project: Thrift Store 3D Printer”

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