Browsing Posts in Stuff I Found Interesting

[caption id="attachment_405" align="alignright" width="150" caption="Outages Early on 2011/06/09"]Toronto Hydro Outage Map[/caption]

Earlier this week our area was hit by a couple severe thunderstorms.  Of course this resulted in many areas having their power knocked out including my office.  During the follow up to having all our servers taken offline when the UPS batteries were exhausted I was following the progress of Toronto Hydro with this nifty outage tracker.

Along a similar vein, over at EISO you can follow energy generation and consumption in Ontario in pseudo real-time.

Also of course when the weather looks suspicious I have to check in with the local doppler radar.

Stock lock key, tumber and 3d printed keyNirav Patel looks like he likes to play with some diverse toys and has shared much at his blog.  Lately it seems he’s taken to 3D printing and offers a some useful tidbits in Physical Keygen: Duplicating House Keys on a 3D Printer.

 

Also, WeatherSpark.com is something I’ve been looking for a long time.  Thank you StumbleUpon!  It’s an easy to navigate way to have a look at historic weather data.  I don’t know how much it covers, but in my area it goes all the way back to 1980!  Looking at temperature, precipitation, cloud cover, thunderstorms and more!

Geo01005′s RepRap Ideas details some of his work around running a repstrap using EMC2 from a couple years ago. He’s documented some of his work around the hot-He also has a YouTube channel.

Andrew Angellotti is founder of spingarage LLC has a new blog that’s looking pretty interesting.  Here’s the first part of a tutorial on brushless motor control.

Tim has a great collection of posts on repstrapping over at BotHacker.

Another concept for 3D printing on a re-purposed inkjet printer.

[youtube id="2nbtZOolSIY" w="240" h="190"]

 

More Links:

Servo and PID tutorials from Galil Motion Control Inc.

Servo Tuning Tutorial (PDF)  from PMC Corp.

To quote the Bad Astronomer, “This picture is totally freaking cool”
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Click to continue reading “I Can Hear the Creationists Now…”

agc2A number of years ago I read a contractor’s report about Computers In Spaceflight.  It was fascinating to me to understand just how much went into this one facet of space programs, and just how little computing power it took.  Any college student familiar with basic electronics can understand the fundamentals of these early computers, but the true magic was what the programmers did to squeeze so much out of such a “small” package.  Now it’s easier for us to have one of our very own thanks to one man’s hard work.

Click to continue reading “DIY Apollo Guidance Computer (AGC)”

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