Browsing Posts in Electronics

Emergency Stop ButtonI’m continuing to work on the 3rd installment of the EMC2 and Servo tutorial, but I realized that I hadn’t seen any great treatments out there for simple e-stop implementations with EMC2 or otherwise in the hobby CNC realms. This is the solution I’ll be using as part of the tutorial apparatus.

Safety systems aren’t sexy and so from what I’ve seen in the community those who know what they’re doing quietly implement them on their own systems but then the rest of the hobbyists and newbies may not even be aware of the need for such things and in the rush to get a machine running and doing the sexy stuff leave themselves open to more risk than is strictly necessary.

Click to continue reading “An Emergency Stop Circuit with EMC2″

20120126-151857.jpgSo I’ve been looking into this Zigbee technology that I’d seen around on various sites. I didn’t really know what it was for but it seemed to be some kind of wireless communication technology for use with microcontrollers and such.

Wow did I ever underestimate that!!! I have another project that I’m contemplating and Zigbee could be an ideal solution for it!

Here are a few links I found.

http://www.controlanything.com/Relay/Device/A0004

Circuit Celler – Zigbee Basics

Wikipedia’s Zigbee Article (for good measure).

 

[caption id="" align="alignright" width="320" caption="Printer Carcass Ready For Use"]Stripped Inkjet Printer[/caption]

So you’d like to play with servo motor control would you? Well hopefully you’ve come to the right place and we’ll actually be able to learn you a thing or two. In this next segment we’re going to learn about some of the internals of an old inkjet printer and how to recycle it to serve our purposes. This is obviously part 2 of the series, where you’ll strip down the printer and prepare it for integration with EMC2.

Click to continue reading “Tutorial: Use an Old Inkjet Printer to Learn Servo Motor Control With EMC2 – Part 2″

Geo01005′s RepRap Ideas details some of his work around running a repstrap using EMC2 from a couple years ago. He’s documented some of his work around the hot-He also has a YouTube channel.

Andrew Angellotti is founder of spingarage LLC has a new blog that’s looking pretty interesting.  Here’s the first part of a tutorial on brushless motor control.

Tim has a great collection of posts on repstrapping over at BotHacker.

So again I wanted to work on putting together the next piece in the EMC2 Servo lab series tonight only to thwart myself.  I shot a bunch of pictures last night with my newly rehabilitated camera. When I sat down today my iPhoto library was kinda corrupted so I decided to rebuild it.  Well right there I lost about 3 hours of access to my pics so I decided to play around a bit with iMovie instead as I know I’ll want to include some video later on, so here’s a quick demo of my apparatus cycling.

[youtube id="kpGAjKVLZgA" w="240" h="190"]
[caption id="attachment_318" align="alignright" width="168" caption="Assembled Kit (screw hardware not included)"]Solarbotics Compact L298 Motor Driver[/caption]

Based on the venerable L298 Dual H-Bridge , Solarbotics has put together a really nice little kit for low-mid voltage level motor control applications.

You trade a little sweat equity for the few bucks you save over other offerings by fully assembling the kit yourself.

One of the nice bits about this kit is that it includes a 5V regulator to supply the logic portion of the L298 natively instead of relying on a 2nd supply voltage to the board.  This helps to make it very easy to drive either 2 DC motors or a single stepper motor from a microcontroller or other control device. 

Click to continue reading “Review: Solarbotics Compact L298 Motor Driver”

[caption id="attachment_260" align="alignright" width="210" caption="Pololu A4983 with a nickle for scale"]Pololu A4983[/caption]

One of the things I need to do while working towards motion control projects is to practice some of the fundamentals.  I’ve worked with many of the concepts and mechanisms professionally, but more from the support end.  I haven’t touched the stuff for a few years now, and want to learn things at a more fundamental level.  In order to do this my plan is to pull motors and mechanisms from recycled equipment (printers, scanners, etc.) and set up a few labs for myself along the way.  Perhaps I’ll try to salvage some of the electronics as well with some good old-fashioned circuit bending.  I should be able to at least reuse motor drivers that are found, but for now I’m going to rely on inexpensive motor driver kits to allow myself more freedom to experiment.

Click to continue reading “Review: Pololu A4983 Micro Stepping Driver Carrier”

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